Select an Author:
Select a Center:
Most Common Tags:
Climate change (39)
Arctic Ocean (25)
Changing Arctic Sea Ice (17)
Ocean and Climate Literacy (9)
ROLE Model Webinar (9)
concept mapping (8)
Ocean Acidification (8)
Alaska Marine Ecosystems (7)
Communicating about Climate Change (7)
Marine Ecosystem Science (7)
07.28.10 webinar (5)
08.10.10 webinar (5)
10.06.10 webinar (5)
Bering Sea (5)
Communicating Science (5)
Culturally-relevant Science Education (5)
carbon cycle (4)
Carbon Cycling (4)
educator post (4)
hydrothermal vents (4)
scientist post (4)
10.20.10 webinar (3)
Alaska K-12 Science Education (3)
Changing Species Distributions (3)
Gray Whale (3)
Herring (3)
icebergs (3)
network (3)
network science (3)
networks (3)
oil spill (3)
Polar Bear (3)
Walrus (3)
02.16.11 webinar (2)
11.03.10 webinar (2)
aerosols (2)
AGU (2)
Alaska Native Perspectives on Climate Change (2)
Changes in Alaska Marine Ecosystems (2)
Changing Ocean Current Patterns (2)
conferences (2)
graduate students (2)
Gulf of Alaska (2)
Humpback Whales (2)
leadership (2)
MSP (2)
Salmon (2)
SEWG (2)
Temperature Patterns (2)
Traditional Knowledge (2)
03.23.11 webinar (1)
09.22.10 webinar (1)
11.17.10 webinar (1)
12.01.10 webinar (1)
Alaska Marine Ecosystem (1)
Alaska Natives (1)
Arctic Ecosystems (1)
Arctic Sea Ice (1)
ASLO (1)
Atlantic Crossing (1)
biological pump (1)
Bowhead Whale (1)
carbon sequestration (1)
case study (1)
Changes in Ocean Current Systems (1)
Changing Alaska Marine Ecosystems (1)
chemical oceanography (1)
Climate Change Impacts on Alaska Marine Ecosystems (1)
Climate Change. Sea Level Rise (1)
climate intervention (1)
collaboration (1)
Collaborative Research (1)
communicating (1)
COSEE New England (1)
COSEE SouthEast (1)
data (1)
Deepwater Horizon (1)
Education and Outreach (1)
EE Week (1)
ENTs (1)
estuaries (1)
Global Climate Change (1)
groups (1)
Gulf of Mexico (1)
Gulf Stream (1)
Hear the Answer (1)
Heat storage in the Ocean (1)
informal science education (1)
Intertidal Community Ecology (1)
iron (1)
K-12 Science Education (1)
King Salmon (1)
Lesson plans (1)
lobsters (1)
Long-term Temperature Patterns (1)
Marine Ecosystems (1)
Methane Hydrates (1)
microbes (1)

Scientists Reply to "Climategate"
12/18/2009 | Marilyn Sigman, Alaska SeaGrant/MAP
Tags: Climate Change, Communicating about Climate Change, Communicating Science, Global Climate Change

Science untarnished by 'Climategate,' U.N. says
by Reuters 11/26/09

The head of the U.N.'s panel of climate experts rejected accusations of bias on Thursday, saying a "Climategate" row in no way undermined evidence that humans are to blame for global warming.

Climate change skeptics have seized on a series of emails written by specialists in the field, accusing them of colluding to suppress data which might have undermined their arguments.

The e-mails, some written as long as 13 years ago, were stolen from a British university by unknown hackers and spread rapidly across the Internet.

But Rajendra Pachauri, who chairs the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), stood by his panel's 2007 findings, called the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). "This private communication in no way damages the credibility of the AR4 findings," he told Reuters in an e-mail exchange.

This report helped to underpin a global climate response which included this week carbon emissions targets proposed by the United States and China, and won the IPCC a share of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.

Global warming: What the science tells us
Washington Post 12/11/09
Thomas R. Karl, director of the National Climatic Data Center at NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) returned from Copenhagen was online Friday, Dec. 11, at 11 a.m. ET to discuss the scientific aspects of climate change with Washington Post readers.
Full transcript

In the Face of Skeptics, Experts Affirm Climate Peril
NY Times 12/6/09

Climategate: Anatomy of a Public Relations Disaster
e360yale.edu Blog 12/10/09
The way that climate scientists have handled the fallout from the leaking of hacked e-mails is a case study in how not to respond to a crisis. But it also points to the need for climate researchers to operate with greater transparency and to provide more open access to data.

Lots of people believe in UFOs. It doesn’t make them right. Lots of people don’t believe in man-made climate change. It doesn’t make them right either.

The media blizzard that has descended on climate science since the hacking of hundreds of e-mails held on the webmail server at the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) of the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England, is set to become a case study — in public relations disasters, in the folly of incontinent electronic communication, in the shortcomings of peer review, and, very probably, in “how not to save the world.”

<< Americans Ready to Act to Sustain Oceans; Kids Know and Care Most 12/18/09 Back to Blogs - Home Emails Stolen from Climate Change Scientists >>